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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
medallions are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. they were first issued in the big apple during the great depression. >> back in 1937, this little piece of tin sold for $10 each. >> his grandfather bought one of the first badges and medallion financial was born. the company has seen quite a return on that first investment and on hundreds more medallions it bought since then. back in the late '70s when the checker cabs were cruising the streets of new york city, a taxi medallion would set you back less than $100,000. now this piece of metal on the front of your cab will set you back more than a million bugs. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year, 70 years. outperforming dow, gold, nasdaq, real estate. you name it. >> analysts marvel at the company's track record. unlike most banks, medal i don't know never had default on taxi loan. >> real estate lending someone defaults it is years before banks get money back. it is terrific collateral. the medallion is the little tin. if somebody doesn't pay
be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and you would have a full-fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibiliti
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
to hold on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore, go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid-'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002, and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to be the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? if so, how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate
in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of those things last night. instead he offered to give up just one of his new powers, vaguely worded right to take all necessary measures to affect the country. he said he would give up the other powers once the referendum had taken place. also yesterday, president obama telephoned president morsi to express his deep concern over the violence and deaths that have occurred. he also urged president morsi to have a dialogue with the opposition without any preconditions. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo
' promotional film foretold everything from nuclear power plants that would light up cities to new and improved means of transportation. >> while nuclear power in locomotives, submarines, ships and even very large airplanes may all but revolutionize future transportation on land, sea and air. >> osgood: on december 2, 1957, 15 years to the day after that chain reaction in chicago, americans first commercial nuclear power plant opened in shippingport pennen. >> this plant has a secure place in american history. it is the first of the world's large-scale nuclear power stations exclusively devoted to peaceful purposes. >> osgood: today with just over 100 plants across the united states producing roughly 20% of our electricity, the nuclear industry's future stands at a cross roads. >> evacuation. please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: opponents of new plant construction point to the leak at pennsylvania's three mile island in 1979, to the soviet reactor meltdown in chernobyl in 1986 and to the fukushima disaster in japan after last year's earthquake and tsunami. supporters count
. jordanian officials say it was first coordinated bombings at large shopping malls in ayman. almost simultaneously, machine gun and bomb attacks on cafe and hotels frequented by diplomats and tourists. with the city's police responding to those attacks, jordanian officials say the terrorists plan to launch the main assault on the u.s. embassy in amman. it's one of america's biggest embassies in the world. tom sanderson says the motivation for the attack was to show p capability. >> to inflict damage on the united states, inflict damage, physical and reputational, on the jordanian government in an environment in which all other governments are certainly dealing with their own difficulties right now. >> reporter: all 11 suspects were rounded up by jordanian security forces in mid october. jordanian officials say they'd planned to strike on november 9th, the seventh anniversary of the last al qaeda attack in jordan. when suicide bombers struck three hotels in amman, killing about 60 people. the man who claimed responsible for that attack was al zarqawi who led the group al qaeda in ira
. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> we are getting pictures in here from michigan and show you and tell you what's happening there. there are large protests, basically closing down the state capitol building here. this is lansingmy, michigan. eight people arrested. there are a couple thousand people protesting inside the building. a number of them outside the capitol building. police, they say they're not letting anyone else inside. 50 state troopers are there on the ground. protests are over a push by the governor of michigan, rick snyder to make michigan a right to work state. letting workers in michigan decide whether or not they want to join unions. so the capitol is scheduled to close in just about two and a half hours from now. so police say anyone who refuses to leave will be arrested and will be charged with trespa trespassing. >>> i want to talk about this, though. one of the biggest companies, the biggest companies without a doubt in the world moving jobs out of china. bringing them back to america. apple c eo tim cook with this announcement. >>
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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